Legislative Activity > 2003 Legislative Report

Oregon Metals Industry Council
2003 Oregon Legislative Report

Note: A full 2003 Oregon Metals Industry Council Legislative Report can be obtained by contacting OMIC at (503) 363-7084 or pacounsel@pacounsel.org.

INTRODUCTION

The 2003 legislative session began on January 14 with gushing assurances of bipartisan cooperation and bold leadership and ended 227 days later in dissension, distrust and dysfunction. Aside from smashing the old record for the longest session ever, the 2003 Session was marked by months of frustrating inactivity as a paralysis settled in while legislators struggled to reconcile sharp divisions over spending levels and priorities and the reality of general fund revenues that were almost $2 billion below the original budgeted amounts for the 2001-2003 biennium.

In the end, a coalition of moderate Republicans and Democrats crafted revenue and spending packages that allowed the Legislature to finally adjourn, but left the institution and its members divided to an unprecedented degree. The legacy of the 2003 Session will be the likely February 2004 vote on the tax increase package that a bare super-majority of the House and Senate supported. Opponents of this measure have begun their campaign to secure the necessary signatures to place it on the ballot. Proponents are gearing up their campaign to convince Oregonians that the service cuts that will result if the measure fails at the polls are untenable and will further hamper Oregon’s economic recovery. Opponents on the other hand will argue tax increases will in fact stall Oregon’s economic recovery.

The Oregon Senate was deadlocked at 15-15. In organizing that chamber, a working agreement was reached that placed Senator Peter Courtney (D-Salem) in the President’s Office and Senator Lenn Hannon (R-Ashland) in the second spot of President Pro Tempore. The Senate co-chair of the budget-writing Joint Ways and Means Committee was first-term Senator Kurt Schrader (D-Canby). Committee chair positions were divided between Republicans and Democrats. Divisions within the Senate Republican and Democrat caucuses were as severe as any in memory. In the end, a coalition of moderate Democrats and Republicans delivered the votes to complete the Senate agenda. Their colleagues at either extreme of the political spectrum were left out, or arguably left themselves out, of the “go home” negotiations that in the past have produced at least a semblance of unity as sessions end.

Despite a strong-looking Republican majority of 35-25, the dynamics in that chamber were little different from the Senate. A group of moderate Republicans, first known as the “Usual Suspects” and later referred to in a less flattering manner, forged an agreement on revenue and spending with the Democrat caucus over the loud opposition of the House Speaker and Majority Leader. Within the Republican caucus, several members began publicly attacking their brethren and on the Democrat side, their strategy could be described as obstructionist at best.

Perhaps the simplest way to sum up this session is to note the fact that the Senate adjourned sine die on August 26 and the House did so on August 27. Not exactly a highly coordinated effort.

Like any session, there were accomplishments. The first significant transportation funding package in years was passed to repair bridges and highways across the state. Major PERS restructuring was approved but faces an uncertain fate in the courts. Budgets were passed that will allow the continuation of many services at levels close to what were reached in the 2001-2003 biennium. A compromise was reached on a statewide 1% lodging tax that will be used to promote Oregon tourism. The Oregon Health Plan was salvaged. Public safety programs were, by and large, maintained at adequate levels.

For the metals industry in Oregon, the 2003 Session was one that yielded very positive results.

The passage of the environmental insurance bill, SB 197, was a major victory. This bill resulted in a pitched battle with the insurance industry and their lobbying team that went right up to the last day of session. The issue took numerous twists and turns on its way to the final successful vote on the House floor.

HB 3183 increases the sales factor of the corporate apportionment formula from 80% to 90% sales factor and 5% payroll and property factors beginning in July 2006 and moves to 100% in July of 2008. This bill also eliminates current limitations on research and development credits and increases the maximum credit amount from $500,000 to $750,000 in tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2006. Unfortunately, HB 3183 also included an increase in the Tri Met payroll tax of 1/10 of 1% of wages paid. Without this provision, the Governor was certain to have vetoed the bill.

At the beginning of the session, it appeared we would be spending our efforts trying to prevent AFL-CIO and environmentalist attempts to roll back pollution control and other tax credits. Having thwarted those efforts, we were able to move HB 2652 through the House, which made enhancements to the pollution control tax credit program. In the Senate the Governor refused to support the bill, and it died in committee.

Major adverse legislation relating to mercury, mandated DEQ regulation and standards and workers compensation were all defeated thanks primarily to the republican controlled House.

The following report details the final status on all the legislative measures that Public Affairs Counsel tracked and worked on behalf of the Oregon Metals Industry Council.

HIGHEST PRIORITY LEGISLATION

SB 297


Enacts so-called "all-sums" method of allocation of insurance companies' duty to defend and indemnify insured for environmental pollution-related claims under certain circumstances. Specifically, where an insured is the subject of an environmental claim, the insured may give notice to its insurance carriers of the claim and demand payment of defense and indemnity costs as they accrue. Properly notified insurers with coverage then have a duty to pay all defense and indemnity sums up to their applicable policy limits. Such insurers have the ability to seek contribution from non-notified insured on a so-called "time on the loss" or "pro rata" basis, as well as the insured where the insured was uninsured or self insured for a period of time. Enacts procedures for the investigation of an insured's notification to its insurers of a lost insurance policy, and sets forth the burden of proof with respect to establishing the existence and terms of such policies.

REFERRED TO SENATE JUDICIARY
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 27 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE JUDICIARY
HOUSE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 43 AYES
SENATE REFUSED TO CONCUR
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE APPOINTED
SENATE PASSED CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT, 26 AYES
HOUSE PASSED CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT, 37 AYES
PRESIDENT SIGNED
SPEAKER SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

HB 3183


Eliminates the limitations on the fields of qualified and basic research under current law (advanced computing, advanced materials, biotechnology, electronic device technology, environmental technology or straw utilization). Increases the maximum amount of the credit per business from $500,000 to $750,000. Applies to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2006. Extends the sunset date on the research and development credit to January 1, 2012. Increases the sales factor of the corporate apportionment formula from 80%, (beginning in May 2003), to 90% sales factor and 5% payroll and property factors (beginning in July 1, 2006). Increases the sales factor of the corporate apportionment formula to 100% sales, beginning July 1, 2008. Provided an exemption to recent changes in the corporate apportionment formula under certain conditions. Increases the maximum payroll tax rate for mass transit districts by 1/10 of 1 % of the wages paid of each employee. Specifies that the district board may adopt an ordinance increasing tax authority if the economy in the district has recovered from the economic downturn. Requires the payroll tax increase to be phased-in over a 10year period beginning on or after January 1, 2004. Sunsets the 10-year phase-in period of the payroll tax increase on January 2, 2014. Limits the annual payroll tax rate increase to .02%. Applies to payroll and self-employment tax reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2004.

REFERRED TO HOUSE REVENUE
HOUSE PASSED, 38 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE REVENUE
SENATE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 21 AYES
HOUSE CONCURRED, 44 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

HB 2652


HB 2652 was the pollution control tax credit bill introduced by OMIC, AOI and several other entities. The measure passed out of the House Revenue Committee and passed the House on a 34-23 vote after surviving an attempt by several Democrats to return the bill to Committee on the pretense that it was an "Enron-friendly" bill. In the Senate the bill was assigned to the Senate Revenue Committee.

The Governor expressed concerns about extending the tax credits, but was enthused about allowing credits for renewable energy equipment manufacturing facilities and wanted to increases the tax credit for solar electric systems.

In the end, the Governor's reservations doomed the bill and the chair of the Senate Revenue Committee, Senator Ryan Deckert (D-Beaverton) refused to allow the bill to move out of committee for a floor vote.

REFERRED TO HOUSE REVENUE
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 34 AYES
DIED IN SENATE REVENUE

 

HB 3420


HB 3420 would have revised Oregon Environmental Cleanup Assistance Act. Defined terms. The bill would have specified that release of hazardous substances constituted damage, destruction and injury to property of state.

DIED IN HOUSE BUSINESS, LABOR AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
 

HB 3438


HB 3438 sought to require that the fee schedule established by Environmental Quality Commission for permits to discharge pollutants into waters of state recover total cost of administering permit program.

DIED IN HOUSE WATER
 

HB 3443


HB 3443 would have specified that fee schedule for permits for disposal of wastes into waters of state must recover all costs of administering permit program.

DIED IN HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE

HB 3540


HB 3540 sought to require that certain state agency fees be set, so as to recover costs. It would have specified a method of determining costs, and required fees to be paid by the primary beneficiary of state agency services.

DIED IN HOUSE RULES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
 

SB 845


SB 845 would have specified that the fee schedule for permits for disposal of wastes into waters of state must recover all costs of administering permit program.

DIED IN SENATE WATER AND LAND USE
 

HB 2887


HB 2887 adds the federal Clean Water Act definitions of point source and non point source for purposes of water pollution statutes.

REFERRED TO HOUSE WATER
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 55 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 27 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 756


SB 756 would have set a state policy regarding persistent bioaccumulative toxins.

DIED IN SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

HB 3655


HB 3655 would have required Environmental Quality Commission to develop priority list of hazardous substances discharged into Willamette River Basin.

DIED IN HOUSE RULES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
 

SB 751


S8 751 expands the list of authorized uses of the Pollution Control Fund to include funding remedial actions related to contaminated sediments in the Willamette River between Swan Island and the confluence with the Columbia River. Establishes the Willamette River Cleanup Authority, consisting of the Governor, two members of the Oregon House of Representatives and two members of the Oregon Senate. Specifies that the Cleanup Authority is to receive reports regarding Superfund listing and make recommendations to the Legislative Assembly on the issuance of bonds. Allows Cleanup Authority to appoint uncompensated advisory or technical committees.

REFERRED TO SENATE TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 22 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE RULES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
HOUSE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 40 AYES
SENATE CONCURRED, 21 AYES
PRESIDENT SIGNED
SPEAKER SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

HB 5018


Appropriates moneys from General Fund to Department of Environmental Quality for certain biennial expenses.

Limits biennial expenditures from fees, moneys or other revenues, including specified bond proceeds and specified federal funds, collected or received by department.

Excludes from expenditure limitation debt service and loans made from Pollution Control Fund and Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund.

REFERRED TO HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES
REFERRED TO HOUSE BUDGET
REFERRED TO HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 43 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE WAYS AND MEANS
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 20 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 633


SB 633 would have established state policy against discharge of mercury, dioxins, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls and certain carcinogens into waters of or on ground in Willamette Basin.

DIED IN SENATE WATER AND LAND USE
 

SB 701



SB 701 sought to direct the Department of Environmental Quality to conduct study of methods that may be used to chemically treat solid waste that contains mercury. Allows department to contract with state institution of higher education to conduct study.

Appropriates moneys to department for purpose of conducting study.

DIED IN SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
 

SB 818


SB 818 would have required person selling or distributing product containing elemental mercury or mercury compounds to notify Director of Human Services. The measure sought to prohibit the sale of products containing elemental mercury or the mercury compound without a label.

DIED IN SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
 

HB 3395


HB 3395 would have required person selling or distributing product containing elemental mercury or mercury compounds to notify Director of Human Services. This bill would have prohibited sale of product containing elemental mercury or mercury compounds without label.

DIED IN HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE
 

HB 2080


Provides that statute of limitations for product liability civil actions commences to run when plaintiff first discovered, or in exercise of reasonable care should have discovered, injury or damage and causal relationship between injury or damage and product. Specifies civil action must be commenced by earlier of two years after discovery or 10 years after purchase of product.

Modifies limitations on product liability civil actions for death.

Revives certain causes of action for death, personal injury or property damage filed before effective date of Act. Requires civil action be refiled within one year of effective date of Act.

REFERRED TO HOUSE JUDICIARY
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 56 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE JUDICIARY
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 29 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

HB 2644


HB 2644 extends temporary schedule for monthly hazardous waste management fees to January 1,2006. Modifies fee schedule.

Repeals temporary fee schedule on January 2, 2006.

REFERRED TO HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE
REFERRED TO HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES
HOUSE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 53 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE WAYS AND MEANS
SENATE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 26 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 196


SB 196 requires generators of hazardous waste to pay a one-time $200 processing fee for obtaining a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number. Directs DEQ to enter into negotiations with the EPA to gain acceptance of technical assistance services as part of the delegated program. Sets the annual hazardous waste generation fee at $110 per metric ton of waste generated. Sets maximum waste generation fees paid in one year at $27,500.

REFERRED TO SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
REFERRED TO SENATE WAYS AND MEANS SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES
SENATE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 28 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE WAYS AND MEANS
HOUSE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 56 AYES
PRESIDENT SIGNED
SPEAKER SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

SB 197


SB 197 would have set new fees and fee increases of Department of Environmental Quality.

DIED IN WAYS AND MEANS
 

HB 2466


HB 2466 would have changed basis by which employers pay hazardous substance fees under Community Right to Know and Protection Act. The act would have specified that employers required to return hazardous substance survey to State Fire Marshal pay annual fee.

DIED IN HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE
 

HB 2466


HB 2466 would have changed basis by which employers pay hazardous substance fees under Community Right to Know and Protection Act. The act would have specified that employers required to return hazardous substance survey to State Fire Marshal pay annual fee.

DIED IN HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE
 

HB 3175


HB 3175 directs the Environmental Quality Commission to establish, by rule, criteria and procedures for Green Permits. Makes the acceptance, processing, and issuing of Green Permits discretionary for the Commission. Requires Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to recover full direct, indirect and associated costs. Requires initial deposit for Green Permit proposal in an amount not to exceed $25,000. Extends sunset of issuance of permits to January 2, 2008.

REFERRED TO HOUSE ENVIRONMENT AND LAND USE
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 51 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 29 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 916


SB 916 specifies activities that disqualify a person from receiving unemployment benefits including: failing to take a drug or alcohol test as required by the employer's reasonable written policy; refusing to cooperate with or attempting to subvert a drug or alcohol testing process; being under the influence of intoxicants while working; possessing a drug unlawfully in violation of written work policies; testing positive for alcohol or unlawful drugs in connection with employment; refusing to enter into or violating a last chance agreement with the employer; leaving work voluntarily, or failing to apply for available suitable work, because the employer has or introduces reasonable drug-free workplace policies or requires consent for drug or alcohol tests or to avoid tests or last chance agreements. Specifies that the person is not disqualified if the person on the date of separation or within ten days of separation is participating in a recognized drug or alcohol program. Applies to claims made on or after the effective date (January 1,2004).

REFERRED TO SENATE RULES
SENATE PASSED, 24 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE RULES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 44 AYES
SENATE CONCURRED AND PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 29 AYES
PRESIDENT SIGNED
SPEAKER SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 921


SB 921 sought to disqualify individual from receipt of unemployment benefits for acts involving alcohol, marijuana or unlawful drugs or violation of last chance agreement.

REFERRED TO SENATE RULES
 

HJR 44


HJR 44 would have proposed amendment to Oregon Constitution to prohibit Legislative Assembly from enacting personal income or corporate excise or income tax credits unless certain conditions are met.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2950


HB 2950 would have eliminated limitation on fields of research for which corporate excise and income tax credits for research may be claimed. The bill also would have phased in increases in maximum amount of credits that taxpayers may claim over three tax years.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3278


HB 3278 sought to increase applicable percentage of certified cost of pollution control facility allowed as credit against income or corporate excise taxes.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3451


HB 3451 would have sunseted all property tax exemptions and special assessments, all income or corporate excise tax credits and all income or corporate excise tax deductions, subtractions or exemptions created by state law. The bill would have retained tax expenditures required by federal law, Oregon Constitution or to avoid double taxation.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2787


HB 2787 sought to require corporate excise tax rate increase to equal highest marginal income tax rate imposed on individuals.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3055


This bill would have increased corporate income and excise tax rates by tying corporate rates to the personal income tax rate and income bracket structure.

Rate changes would have been applied to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2004.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3056


HB 3056 would have reduced personal income tax rates, and the tax rate on net
capital gains.

This measure also would have established a business activity tax.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3081


HB 3081 would have increased the amount of the minimum tax for corporations, and provided for annual increases in the amount of minimum tax for corporations based on increases in the consumer price index.

This would have been applied to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2004.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3082


HB 3082 would have increased the corporate minimum tax, established an alternative minimum tax based on, at the election of taxpayers, Oregon's gross profits or Oregon's gross receipts. It would have required a corporation to pay the greater of the minimum tax or an alternative minimum tax.

It would have been applied to tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2004.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE

HB 3500


HB 3500 would have phased in reductions in personal income tax rates and the elimination of taxation of net capital gains. It would have increased the earned income tax credit and made the credit refundable.

This bill would have updated the connection date to the federal estate tax law and eliminated the Oregon inheritance tax on estates of decedents who die after a certain date.

Taxes on malt beverages and cider would have been increased.

A general sales and use tax would have been established. The Department of Revenue would have been directed to enter into multistate agreements to streamline the administration of sales and use taxes. The sales tax revenues would have been dedicated to kindergarten through grade 12 public education.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3057


HB 3057 would have increased the corporate excise and income tax rates for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2004, and before January 1, 2008. It would have dedicated the net revenue from the tax to higher education, community colleges, including workforce development, and student financial assistance.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3448


HB 3448 would have reduced personal income tax rates. Corporate excise and income tax rates would have been reduced for two years and then corporate excise and income taxes would have been eliminated.

This bill would have established a business activity tax. The tax base would have been computed so as to approximate gross receipts from business activity in Oregon less purchases. The business activity tax rate would have been increased after two years.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 3450


HB 3450 sought to increase the amount of minimum tax for corporations.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2506


HB 2506 would have increased corporate excise and income tax credit limits for qualified research and basic research.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE

HB 3466


HB 3466 would have allowed certain corporations to sell tax credit allowed for research and development expenses.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

SB 813


SB 813 sought to reduce personal and corporate income taxes rate on net capital gains. This bill would have phased in reduction over three years.

DIED IN SENATE REVENUE
 

SB 91


SB 91 would have reduced income and corporate excise tax rates imposed on
capital gains.

DIED IN SENATE REVENUE
 

SB 361


SB 361 would have reduced rate of tax on capital gains of personal income and corporate income and excise taxpayers.

REFERRED TO SENATE TRANSPORTATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
DIED IN SENATE REVENUE

HB 2505


HB 2505 sought to reduce rate of tax on capital gains of personal income and corporate income and excise taxpayers.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2806


HB 2806 would have permitted net capital gain to be subtracted from taxable income of personal income or corporate excise or income taxpayers. The measure required addition of net capital loss to taxable income of personal income taxpayers if net capital loss was taken as deduction for federal tax purposes.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2840


HB 2840 would have reduced rate of income or corporate excise tax imposed on net capital gain.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2556


HB 2556 sought to impose, upon elector approval of House Joint Resolution 13 (2003), a general retail sales and use tax on sale and use of tangible personal property.

There would have been numerous exemptions, such as food, utilities, prescription drugs, housing and animals, feed, seed, plants, fertilizer and pesticides used for commercial, agricultural, horticultural or silvicultural activities.

It would have prohibited local governmental general retail sales and use taxes, and provided that proceeds of the sales tax be placed in the General Fund.

Penalties would have been provided.

Personal income taxes and corporate excise and income taxes would have been eliminated for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2005.

This bill would have taken effect on the effective date of constitutional amendment proposed by House Joint Resolution 13 (2003), and become operative on January 1,2005.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2017


HB 2017 would have restored business income apportionment formula used for income tax purposes to payroll factor plus property factor plus double-weighted sales factor.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2183


HB 2183 sought to modify definition of sales used to apportion business income for income tax purposes.

DIED IN HOUSE BUSINESS, LABOR AND CONSUMER AFFAIRS
 

SB 469



SB 469 adjusts certain truck fees, and repeals provision of House Bill 2148 that wouldhave distributed moneys from Department of Transportation to counties and cities.

REFERRED TO SENATE REVENUE
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 22 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE REVENUE
HOUSE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 47 AYES
SENATE CONCURRED, 24 AYES
PRESIDENT SIGNED
SPEAKER SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED

 

SB 549


Increases maximum payroll tax rate that mass transit district may impose in payroll tax reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2004. Requires board to determine that economy of district has recovered prior to increasing tax. Requires district to phase in increases over 10 years. Limits amount of each incremental rate increase. (See HB 3183)

REFERRED TO SENATE REVENUE
SENATE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 20 AYES
REFERRED TO HOUSE TRANSPORTATION
DIED IN HOUSE RULES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

HB 2751


Establishes payroll assessment on wages paid in payroll tax and assessment reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2004. Dedicates assessment revenue to funding Medicaid portion of Family Health Insurance Assistance Program. (See HB 3183)

DIED IN HOUSE HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
 

HB 3445


Increases maximum payroll tax rate that mass transit district may impose in payroll tax reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2004. Requires district to phase in increases over 10 years. Limits amount of each incremental rate increase. (See HB 3183)

DIED IN HOUSE TRANSPORTATION
 

HJR 37


HJR 37 would have amended Oregon Constitution to increase certain limits on property taxes, as applied to nonresidential property. Would have permitted counties and metropolitan service districts to impose property taxes under school limitation, if taxes were separately identified and used exclusively for educational purposes.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HJR 46


HJR 46 would have proposed an amendment to the Oregon Constitution to modify existing property tax limits that apply only to residential property.

DIED IN HOUSE REVENUE
 

HB 2186


HB 2186 establishes connection date of December 31, 2002, for changes to Internal Revenue Code that are unrelated to definition of taxable income. Establishes tax year of taxpayer as connection date for certain federal tax law changes after December 31, 2005.

Allows Department of Revenue to prescribe by rule different due date for returns filed in alternative format.

Restates type of compensation paid to certain nonresident personnel performing duties on vessels operating in interstate waters that is not considered income from sources within Oregon.

REFERRED TO HOUSE REVENUE
HOUSE PASSED A-ENGROSSED, 47 AYES
REFERRED TO SENATE REVENUE
SENATE PASSED B-ENGROSSED, 17 AYES
HOUSE CONCURRED, 41 AYES
SPEAKER SIGNED
PRESIDENT SIGNED
GOVERNOR SIGNED